The Michigan Department of Corrections plans to close the Ojibway Correctional Facility in Gogebic County on Dec. 1. Two other prisons have been closed in the past two years – Pugsley Correctional Facility in Grand Traverse County and the West Shoreline Correctional Facility in Muskegon County. Republican gubernatorial nominee Bill Schuette and Democratic gubernatorial nominee Gretchen Whitmer are planning three televised debates and chose their lieutenant governor running mates. Schuette tapped former state representative and Kent County Clerk Lisa Posthumus Lyons and Whitmer named Garlin Gilchrist II of Detroit as her running mate. U.S. District Judge Gershwin Drain has issued a permanent injunction stopping the state from enacting Public Act (PA) 268 which eliminated the option of straight-ticket voting in the foreseeable future for Michigan voters. Gov. Rick Snyder’s administration is recommending sales tax collected from online retailers outside of Michigan – more than $200 million – be spent to fix roads. Governor Snyder has announced new plans that would provide universal access to highspeed internet for every Michigan resident, business, region and community and the Michigan Supreme Court ruled Ann Arbor and Clio school districts’ ban on anyone bringing a weapon into a school building will stand. For more information on these and other legislative issues, click here for the August 2018 Karoub Report.

The Aug. 7 Primary Election set a modern day voter turnout record with the number of ballots cast expected to exceed 2 million. Michigan voters will hear “Fix the Damn Roads” and “I have been endorsed by President Trump” for the next three months as Democrat Gretchen Whitmer and Republican Bill Schuette won their respective primaries. Campaigning will continue to see who will succeed Governor Rick Snyder as state's next Governor in the November general election. In his first foray into politics, John James, an Operation Iraqi Freedom veteran and businessman, defeated venture capitalist Sandy Pensler to win the Republican primary. James will run against three-term incumbent U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-Delta Twp.) in November’s election. Other state senator and representative primary race winners are also highlighted in the Special Election Karoub Report.

Lawmakers have only 30 days of session scheduled for the remainder of the year with the House actually at 29 days. The House will return to session after Labor Day for the month of September, although three of those weeks are just two-day session weeks. The Senate meets one extra day that month. But the Michigan League of Conservation Voters (MLCV) says lawmakers should return to Lansing immediately to undertake investigations as to why the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2012 did not take a staffers report connecting PFAS chemical contamination to various diseases and health issues. Gov. Rick Snyder has signed into law legislation (SB 652, 653 and 654) that gives him the power to appoint three new commissions within the DEQ. Closing arguments have been held in a 24-day preliminary exam on whether Department of Human Services Director Nick Lyons had individual legal duty by statute or otherwise to notify the public about Flint’s Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks in 2014 and 2015. The Michigan Supreme Court (MSC) recently heard oral arguments from both sides of the Voter Not Politicians (VNP) ballot proposal to have an independent commission redraw Michigan’s political districts. The Michigan Chamber of Commerce has mounted a legal challenge to a ballot proposal that is designed to put an end to gerrymandering in the state. The paid sick leave and minimum wage increase ballot proposals are opposed by Michigan Opportunity, a ballot question committee affiliated with the Michigan Restaurant Association. Michigan Opportunity has filed a complaint in the Court of Appeals alleging the minimum wage increase proposal “unlawfully seeks to amend the current law by reference and without re-enactment and publication of that law as required.” Michigan drivers need to keep their distance from bikers, allowing at least three feet of space while passing bicyclists on the road under legislation (HB 4198, 4185 and 4265) signed into law by Gov. Snyder. Click here for more details in the July 2018 Karoub Report.

Before Michigan lawmakers left for summer break, they sent the 56.8 billion budget for Fiscal Year 2019 to Gov. Rick Snyder, which has record levels for education and transportation money. However, Democrats have concerns about “raiding” $900 million in K-12 money to bail out the stagnant General Fund; Gov. Snyder says he will sign a bill requiring many Medicaid recipients to work at least 80 hours a month. The bill is a compromise from the initial proposal which included a 29-hour work week requirement and a provision allowing counties with unemployment rates of 8.5 percent or higher to be exempt. That provision was removed; The House took no action on the last day of the 40-day constitutional deadline to legislatively adopt and amend a citizen initiative to legalize recreational use of marijuana. Now voters will decide in November whether to make pot legal in Michigan; The Senate passed legislation (SB 787 and 1014) that would allow seniors 65 and older to choose a $50,000 personal protection auto insurance policy as opposed to the otherwise mandated unlimited lifetime benefit as part of a scaled-back auto insurance package. The House took no action on the auto insurance reform bills before the break; Gov. Snyder vetoed the Health Insurance Claims Assessment (HICA); and Petition signatures calling for passage of a mandatory paid sick time leave policy in Michigan were filed with the state’s election division by the Michigan Time to Care Coalition. If approved, employees could bank up to 72 hours, or nine days, of paid sick leave a year for those who work for employers of 10 employees or more. Those working for smaller businesses could bank up to 40 hours of paid leave with 32 more hours of unpaid leave. Click on June 2018 Karoub Report for more information on these and other legislative issues.

The Committee to Keep Pot out of Neighborhoods and Schools was fighting a ballot proposal to legalize marijuana. Now, it is urging the Legislature to take up the initiative, amend it and pass legislation for adult recreational use; Updated revenue estimates set by state economists indicate Gov. Snyder and legislators will have a combined $500 million more than expected for this fiscal year and next fiscal year; The strictest drinking water rules for lead in the country are about complete, according to Gov. Rick Snyder’s administration. The plan would eventually result in the replacement of all 500,000 lead service pipes in Michigan unless a legislative committee objects by June; Environmentalist billionaire Tom Steyer is dropping his effort to put before the voters in November a ballot proposal that would raise the state’s renewable portfolio standard to 30 percent by 2030; After the U.S. Supreme Court gave the state the ability to regulate the running of a sports book for gaming operations, the Michigan House Regulatory Reform Committee may schedule a hearing to permit casinos to offer sports team wagers; and Pancreatic cancer has taken the life of State Superintendent Brian Whiston. He was diagnosed with the disease in late 2017 and had officially gone on long-term disability just days before his passing. Click on the May 2018 Karoub Report for more information.