Contracts

CONTRACT

"It was a pretty good contract,” said MAP Executive Director Fred Timpner of the 10 percent pay raises in the first year and the 5-year agreement. “Additionally, the Employer has agreed they will opt out of PA 152 and pay all (premium and deductible) costs associated with the healthcare for the life of the agreement. For those people who have (Retiree) HSA accounts, the Employer will kick in $2,000 a year from when the Employee was hired.”

“The healthcare and the pay raises are the two biggest for us,” said Sgt. Steve Kramer of Green Oak Township Command local union. “For all of our surrounding departments, we were really severely underpaid. That’s where that 10 percent came from - to get us up to the other local departments.”

Contract Duration: 5-year agreement ratified Oct. 11, 2017 and effective 7-1-17 to 7-1-22.

Wage Increases:
10% increase effective July 1, 2017.
3% increase effective July 1, 2018.
2% increase effective July 1, 2019.
2% increase effective July 1, 2020.
2% increase effective July 1, 2021.

CONTRACT

"It was a pretty good contract,” said MAP Executive Director Fred Timpner of the 10 percent pay raises in the first year of the 5-year agreement. “Additionally, the Employer has agreed they will opt out of PA 152 and pay all (premium and deductible) costs associated with the healthcare for the life of the agreement. For those people who have (Retiree) HSA accounts, the Employer will kick in $2,000 a year from when the Employee was hired.”

Contract Duration: 5-year agreement ratified Oct.11, 2017 and effective 7-1-17 to 7-1-22.

Wage Increases:
10% increase effective July 1, 2017.
3% increase effective July 1, 2018.
2% increase effective July 1, 2019.
2% increase effective July 1, 2020.
2% increase effective July 1, 2021.

CONTRACT

"The law says every year the Employer can decide if they’ll opt out, go hard cap, or go 80/20. For the last seven years, they have opted out. Employees hired prior to 2012 were only going to pay 10 percent in premium shares instead of the 20 percent. We were able to hang onto that for another year," said MAP Labor Relations Specialist Jim Steffes. "They’re going to get a shift premium from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. of 20 cents an hour which they never had before. We held onto the option for those that buy up to PPO 1. PPO 4 is their standard health care plan. The Employer was trying to take it out.”

Contract Duration: 3-year agreement ratified Feb. 24, 2017 and effective 1-1-17 to 12-31-19.

Wage Increases:
1% increase effective Jan. 1, 2017.
2% increase effective Jan. 1, 2018.
2% increase effective Jan. 1, 2019.
• $500 signing bonus effective upon ratification.

Fringe Benefits: Added shift premium of 20 cents per hour for 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. shift. Continue annual wellness and equipment reimbursement program of up to $500. Added $100 per year payout for having annual physical.

Health Insurance: Preserved 10 percent Employee premium share for healthcare for 2017. In 2018, Employer may continue to opt out of PA 152 or switch to 80 percent of premium paid by Employer and 20 percent paid by Employees. Employees continue to have choice of standard PPO 4 with option to buy up to PPO 1.

Bargaining Team: MAP Labor Relations Specialist Jim Steffes, Livingston County Sergeants Vice President Gary Childers, President Ryan Vorhies, Sgt. Dan Knapp and Sgt. Brad Fetner.

By Jennifer Foley, MAP Editor

MAP won wage increases, retroactivity, and preserved several contractual items for St. Clair Shores Police through ACT 312 arbitration.

MAP was able to obtain 2 percent wage increases in each of the three years of the contract, effective July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2017, for a total 6 percent increase over the life of the contract.

“The Employer was proposing 2 percent with no retroactivity involved. The contract expired July 1, 2014,” said Association President Paul Opper. “We were able to come to an agreement with retroactivity. We were both on same page on all the 2 percent increases.”

The Employer sought to reduce the pension multiplier for new hires to 2%. The Union fought for and was awarded a better agreement. For any new member hired after the 312 award, the pension multiplier to be applied for each year of service shall be 2.25% for the first 25 years of service. The pension multiplier will be 1% for 26-30 years of service or more. The final average compensation for Employees hired after the 312 award will include base wages only.

“For the new hires, the Employer initially wanted a 2.0 multiplier - that’s what the fire fighters got from their arbitration, but we were able to get a 2.25 multiplier on base wages only,” Opper said.

By Jennifer Foley, MAP Editor

A Sterling Heights patrol officer received a reduction in his discipline and was made whole after Michigan Association of Police (MAP) filed a grievance on his behalf.

The Officer, who worked the night shift, was given a five-day suspension with an additional five days held in abeyance for one year from the time of the incident for falling asleep while on duty and failing to respond to a radio call for approximately 10 minutes on May 18, 2014. On the night in question, the Officer was called to the station and interviewed by a Sergeant at which time the Officer acknowledged that he fell asleep.

The next day, May 19, 2014, the Officer was placed on desk duty and while he was off work, on May 22 he went to see a doctor for excessive daytime sleepiness. He was referred to a sleep disorders institute where he was diagnosed with a shift work related sleep disorder. He followed the doctor’s prescribed remedies and had no further incidents.

During the investigation, it was also found that the Grievant had fallen asleep while working with another officer and did not report for a run to which both were assigned. The officer spoke directly with the Grievant, but did not report the incident to a supervisor.

The Officer provided the City with his doctor’s assessment and even offered to allow the City doctor to examine him. The City declined to send the grievant to their employer physician. The grievance filed by MAP on the Officer’s behalf requested removal of all discipline “due to (the Officer’s) documented medical condition and that he be made whole.”

The Arbitrator compared the Officer’s case to that of three other police officials in the same department, all of whom received less stringent discipline than the Grievant. “Grievant was given the most severe discipline, a five-day suspension, in contrast to a four-day suspension, a letter of reprimand and a one-day suspension,” the Arbitrator wrote in his decision. “The second and more critical distinction is that Grievant sought medical assistance for what he perceived to be a problem he had experienced at least once, if not twice, before while on duty. The Grievant promptly took steps to seek and obtain medical advice, was referred to a medical doctor with expertise in the sleep disorder area, and provided that documentation to his employer. Grievant participated in a two-day sleep study and followed all of his medical doctor’s plan for addressing his disorder.”